How To… assemble the compenents of a good stew.

Repost from a while back. ^^

Stew is awesome for you.

Think about it: it’s a combination of anything you want or need (fruits, tubers, meats, legumes, grains, fish, nuts, seeds, leaves, roots…), all cooked until perfectly digestible. If you want to preserve certain heat-unstable vitamins, then you can just add an ingredient at the end, when your bowl is cooled and ready to eat. The only utensils you need are a chopping board, a few knives, a pot, a stirring spoon and a ladle for serving; all of which clean easily because of the amount of moisture in a stew. You keep all of the nutrients that are lost in boiling and throwing the water away. You keep all of the fat that is lost in roasting or frying something. Chances of getting charcoal in it are very low, which reduces potential carcinogens. It is full of fluid for hydration. It can be recycled into soups, pies and curries. A stew is absolute nutritional and gustatory perfection, specifically because it’s so adaptable. You can make a Paleo stew or a legume-based stew or a fish stew or a vegetarian stew or a four-meat stew or a vegan stew or a boiled stew or a soaked stew… You can make it however you want or need and season it perfectly to taste. It is warming like a soup and hearty like a roast dinner.

It’s also amazingly good for you. But Jamie Lewis has already gone into this in far greater depth than anyone else; so, provided you’re not easily offended and/or can block images on your computer, read on: Part 1, Part 2, Part 3.

Being the way I am, I’d also like to go into how economical stews, curries and the likes can be, as well as how easy they are to make. So, without further ado, here are some stews (new and from my old blog) that are cheap to make and good for you. Every one of these was basically made by hacking the ingredients up and putting them in a pot on a low-to-medium heat for a few hours. They are also hatchet stews: stews made with whatever we had lying around or needed to use up. So, whilst they’re all amazing and worth making, think of this more as an example of how cheaply and easily you can make an amazing stew with anything you have in the house.

Stew 1: Lamb and chicken stew.

  • Ingredients: 800g lamb chump chops, 6 chicken drumsticks, 5 chicken thighs, 800g chopped tomato, 700g potato, 2 large carrots, Italian herb mix, salt, pepper.
  • Servings: 9.
  • Cost per serving: 91p.
  • Nutrition per serving: 743kcal, 47g fat, 59g protein, 21g carbs.

Stew 2: Chicken liver curry.

  • Ingredients: 800g chicken livers, 300g rice, 400g peas, 200g mixed veg, 400g chopped tomato, (300g butter), tahina, paprika, anis, nutmeg, cinnamon, garlic, ginger, salt.
  • Servings: 6.
  • Cost per serving: 42p without butter, 62p with butter.
  • Nutrition per serving: Without butter: 375kcal, 7g fat, 28g protein, 50g carbs. With butter: 744kcal, 48g fat, 28g protein, 50g carbs.

Stew 3: Ox heart stew.

  • Ingredients: 300g ox heart, 10 mushrooms, 3 carrots, 1 onion, 300g chopped tomatoes, 75g butter, thyme, rosemary, basil, garlic.
  • Servings: 1.
  • Cost per serving: £2.14.
  • Nutrition per serving: 1093kcal, 73g fat, 64g protein, 45g carbs.

Stew 4: Sweet chicken stew.

  • Ingredients: 2 chicken quarters, 4 stalks of celery, 24 dates, 100g raisins, 100g butter, 600g potato, peppercorns, salt, cloves, thyme.
  • Servings: 2 without rice or butter, 4 with 100g rice and 50g butter.
  • Cost per serving:£1.07 without rice and added butter, 78p with.
  • Nutrition per serving: Without rice and butter: 1601kcal, 69g fat, 66g protein, 179g carbs. With rice and extra butter: 1484kcal, 76g fat, 35g protein, 165g carbs.

Bake in the oven near the end to brown the tops of the chicken quarters..

So not only are stews good for you and easy to make, but they’re probably one of the most economical dinners out there, regardless of whether you’re looking for pure value, value-fullness or value-calories.

 

For help starting out homemaking, check out The ESSENTIAL Beginner Homemaker’s Guide. For help budgeting all your everday and not-so-everyday essentials, from food to transport to clothes, check out On A Budget: The good homemaker’s guide to economizing.
Advertisements

Comments Always Appreciated. :)

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s