You don’t “deserve” to escape cubicle hell.

The other day I was watching a few videos about why people left their previous jobs. And it struck me as odd how many people will quit a job because:

-they’re not allowed to compete with their company in their spare time

-they don’t have enough time for their creative, yet underpaid online work, ie blogging or videos

-the work environment had standards and targets they were expected to meet

Of course, some of those are the very reasons I chose to work for myself. Don’t get me wrong: I completely understand the desire to escape cubicle hell, to either never set foot in it or to leave it. But the way so many people of my generation approach this dilemma is entitled, pure and simple.

We’re not talking about people pushing through with work and aspiring to make better of themselves one day, or people quitting their dead-end jobs and pouring out sweat as they get a business started. We’re talking about people moving back in with their parents, going on welfare and begging for blogger handouts because they would rather be parasites than drudges.

And all I can think is: this is not pursuing your dreams. This is believing you have a god-given right to avoid cubicle hell. This is believing you are somehow better than generation upon generation of people who fried chips, scrubbed toilets, swept floors and typed copies, who toiled in mindless jobs to keep food on the table.

It’s all well and good to aspire to leave that environment, or to avoid it. By all means, if you can: do. But you don’t “deserve” to avoid cubicle hell any more than any other person out there. You aren’t special. And if you can’t cut the mustard, then back to the cubicle it is.

Sorry…

…but not really.

In a related note, apparently at some point I was added to the RationalWiki list of secular doormats, probably by the very same special snowflakes who believe they deserve charity to live and blog on. 😛 I take it as an award.

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TTFN and Happy Hunting!

 

For help starting out homemaking, check out The ESSENTIAL Beginner Homemaker’s Guide. For help budgeting all your everday and not-so-everyday essentials, from food to transport to clothes, check out On A Budget: The good homemaker’s guide to economizing.
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It’s easy to be a defeatist.

It really is. Anyone can choose to be a defeatist. Our world is not an easy one to live in.

We’re surrounded by others, yet it’s not easy to cultivate the relationships we aspire to.

We’re surrounded by money and the wealthy, yet it’s not easy to get your slice of the pie.

We’re surrounded by amazing technology, yet we’re still suffering ill health, old age and sometimes we even have to unclog a toilet.

Boo hoo.

Sorry, but life is loads easier than it used to be. Do you think making and keeping friends was easier when we had to write letters as soon as someone lived out of town? Do you think that a young man aspiring to have a harem had to work less at it when the most viable mode of transport was the horse? Do you think married couples had less relationship maintenance to do when their options were between two suitors chosen by their parents and marriage was a lifelong, enforceable contract?

Do you think it was easy to “make it” when the average person died by 50, when taxes were decided only by the rich and when you had no access to education whatsoever? Do you think it was easy to become rich when your land and house and everything in it was officially owned by a Lord? Do you think it was easier to be healthy when we were hungry, thirsty, plagued with dysentery and leprosy and died of the flu?

We’ve got it good. We’ve got it really good.

That isn’t to say all failure is your own fault. We started out under worse stars than Paris Hilton or Donald Trump. But to pretend the modern world is some magically evil Unfairland is just the easy way out.

It’s easy to join the Church of Euthanasia, to call liberal democracy the “end of history”, to enjoy the decline, to call gender and race a social construct, to blame the Government and the aliens and the Patriarchy and Satan. It’s easy to be defeatist.

I’m not saying you can’t, or shouldn’t feel that way. Just that, as far as decisions go, you’re not being radical or amazing or transformative by saying “welp, there’s nothing I can do” and sitting back on your butt and never doing anything again.

You’re just being kind of emo.

TTFN and Happy Hunting!

 

For help starting out homemaking, check out The ESSENTIAL Beginner Homemaker’s Guide. For help budgeting all your everday and not-so-everyday essentials, from food to transport to clothes, check out On A Budget: The good homemaker’s guide to economizing.

Being All You Can Be. Part II: Self-Sufficiency.

As mentioned in Part I, being all you can be is not just about doing a great job, but also about reaching your fingers into as many pies as you can comfortably handle.

The next element to being all you can be is working out what to focus on. After all, you can’t do it all or have it all, but you shouldn’t really devote yourself to one thing forever either. The woman in the last example is a police officer for her paid work, a housewife at home and a writer in her spare time. What is stopping her from wearing more hats? And why did she choose those three?

She wears three hats because that is what her time allows. Once you’ve worked all day, sorted the house and written for a couple of hours, there isn’t much more you can do. And she chose those three because they represent the pillars of valuable work: finance, self-sufficiency and enjoyment. She gets paid, she avoids paying someone else to do her work and she does something she loves.

And we all have potential to embrace those three pillars and build them into the life we want to live. When that time arrives, we’ll be all we can be.

In Part III I will begin to discuss each pillar in more detail, so we can be all we can be.

TTFN and Happy Hunting!

 

For help starting out homemaking, check out The ESSENTIAL Beginner Homemaker’s Guide. For help budgeting all your everday and not-so-everyday essentials, from food to transport to clothes, check out On A Budget: The good homemaker’s guide to economizing.