Being All You Can Be. Part I: Quantity and Quality.

When we hear someone tell us to be all we can be, we often confuse this with “be the best you can be”. If you are a writer, be the best writer you can be, if you are a housewife, be the best housewife you can be, if you are a police officer, be the best police officer you can be. But being the best you can be is only one half of the equation. To be all we can be we not only need to have the quality (be the best you can be), but we also need to fulfill a quantity quota (be the most you can be).

For example, I am sure that when I mentioned the writer, housewife, police officer explanations you imagined three different people. But one person could just as easily be all three. We are not just the thing we do most often, or the thing we make money from, or the thing we love: we are the sum total of everything we do. So not only would this woman want to be the best she can be in all three categories, she needs to acknowledge that all three categories are a part of her and that excluding any one of them to make herself better at another is not being all she can be, it’s simply redirecting whilst staying the same.

Thus, I put forward that whoever you are and whatever you do, in order to be all you can be you must do everything you can and achieve everything your heart desires. Quantity and quality alike. This series will be short, to the point and with plenty of room for thought or addition from you readers, so feel free to chip in! In Part II I will discuss the concept of self-sufficiency and the potential we all have for independence.

TTFN and Happy Hunting!

 

For help starting out homemaking, check out The ESSENTIAL Beginner Homemaker’s Guide. For help budgeting all your everday and not-so-everyday essentials, from food to transport to clothes, check out On A Budget: The good homemaker’s guide to economizing.

25 Maxims and Philosophies to Live By.

1. Have fun, enjoy yourself. Don’t necessarily go out of your way to avoid work, just try and find pleasure in everything you do.

2. Don’t live assuming you will die tomorrow. What if you make it to 100?

3. Work hard at something you love. There’s reward in everything, even monetary reward, when you look hard enough.

4. Don’t expect anything. Nobody owes you gifts, kindness or time. Be grateful for everything you have been given.

5. What is good and right is not always what is true. Live life according to life’s law.

6. Don’t get too obsessed with this, but: You are actually the protagonist of your own life and it happens to be a choose-your-path story.

7. If it isn’t broke, don’t fix it. If it’s broke, fix it. If it’s broke and determined to stay that way, leave it to itself.

8. There are consequences and reactions to everything you do. Accept them and carry on.

9. Don’t get caught up in anger, sadness, thrills or worry. Intense emotions are habit forming if indulged.

10. Respect your body, the way that it’s made and its needs. It has got you this far and will carry you further. It is not a mistake.

11. Think about your future self, their needs, wants and concerns.

12. Harden yourself to critique, pain, fear, solitude, etc. You will experience them again and again, so learn to bear with them.

13. Set yourself goals for everything you do. It keeps your mind on track.

14. It’s better to invest 80% of yourself in one thing and 20% between nine than to invest 10% in each thing.

15. The numbers you are judged by matter very much to the people you have yet to meet.

16. Keep going as long as you get a step further each day. Give up when you haven’t advanced a step in three days.

17. Satisfy your desire to eight tenths of its maximum. Feel rewarded and happy, but not fully satisfied.

18. Everything has a purpose, and a second purpose, and a third purpose. Reuse and make the most of everything.

19. Only invest in something that will at least return 100% of what you put in.

20. Someone who makes many accidents is as troublesome as someone who is trying to do harm.

21. If you’re in your neighbour’s melon field, he could assume you were stealing them. Only stand there when absolutely necessary.

22. Excess of one thing usually means limitations on another.

23. Not every once-in-a-lifetime-opportunity is worth taking.

24. Others are blind to some truths and have seen truths you are blind to.

25. If it doesn’t matter, then don’t worry about it. If it matters, see what you can do about it.