5 Ways To Use Up Milk.

This is part of the Nutritional Health Series, check the tag for the other posts!

Seeing as I’m actually trying to reduce the amount of dairy I consume, what with being lactose intolerant and all, we sometimes hit some trouble using up leftover dairy. And milk is a big one. When Jon is having porridge, we will buy in whole three and four pint jugs of milk, just for that. When he isn’t we tend to just need one or two at a time and even then we may throw some away.

But there is often an overlap between when we need a lot of milk and when we don’t need any. And I can’t exactly drink two pints of milk overnight so as to not waste it. So here are five recipes to use up any leftover milk so it doesn’t go to waste.

1: White sauce.

Ingredients per pint of milk:

  • 1/4 cup flour
  • 1/4 cup butter
  • 2 tsp black pepper
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 2 tsp herbs (optional)

Recipe:

  1. Mash the butter and flour together until fully blended.
  2. Heat the milk in a pan.
  3. Slowly incorporate the butter-flour.
  4. Simmer until the milk thickens. Stir continually.
  5. Season and simmer a little longer.
  6. Use or preserve.

This one works well for fish, chicken and cured pork, but can also make a nice base for black pepper sauce, which goes with anything.

2: Froth pudding.

Recipe:

  1. Boil the milk until a froth forms.
  2. Scoop the froth and place to one side.
  3. Repeat until little to no milk is left.
  4. Leave the froth to set in the fridge.
  5. Flavour with fruits, honey, nuts and seeds, chocolate, fudge…etc.

This is a common Indian street food, requires nothing but milk and home-made treat and goes well with any sweet dish.

3: Dulce de leche.

Ingredients per pint of milk:

  • 4 tbsp sugar
  • 1 tsp coffee or cocoa (optional)

Recipe:

  1. Bring the milk to a boil.
  2. Dissolve the sugar in it.
  3. Continue boiling as it evaporates.
  4. Once the mix goes amber, start stirring continually.
  5. Cook until a thick, smooth paste the colour of fudge results.
  6. Cool.

This Spanish dish is very similar to a thicker, less chewy toffee and goes very well in ice-cream, on bread, in cakes and in puddings.

4: Milk jelly.

Ingredients per pint of milk:

  • 100g jelly mix or soft gelatine
  • 2tbsp sugar

Recipe:

  1. Put the jelly in a jug.
  2. Add boiling water to the 1/4 pint mark.
  3. Stir to dissolve the jelly.
  4. Add the milk. Stir in.
  5. Pour into a mold to set.

This one is great fun, sets really quickly and kids tend to love it.

5: Pan de leche.

Ingredients per pint of milk:

  • 1 cup self-raising flour or flour and raising agents
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 3 tbsp sugar (for sweet version)
  • 2 tsp pepper (for savory version)
  • 1 egg (for glazing)

Recipe:

  1. Mix the dry ingredients.
  2. Fold in the milk.
  3. Mix until the mass is firm and only a bit sticky.
  4. Form rolls.
  5. Paint the rolls with a beaten egg.
  6. Bake in an oven preheated at 150C for 20-25min.

Another Spanish recipe. Great breads, nice both in sweet and savory forms, lovely with jam.

And those are five ways I use up leftover milk when there’s a risk it will go off.

Dulce de leche and milk jelly last almost indefinitely.

Pan de leche and white sauce last four or five days.

Milk froth pudding lasts only a couple of days and needs to be refrigerated.

You can freeze dulce de leche and white sauce, as well as turn milk froth pudding into an ice-cream (that lasts ages).

Generally, all of them will lengthen the life of your plain milk and make it a different type of food you can use faster.

What do you find you need to use up at home? Feel free to say in the comments and I’ll find a few recipes from my repertoire to help you make good use of leftovers!

TTFN and Happy Hunting!

How To… make “dirty water”.

This is the first in a series of posts. Check the tags for “Nutritional Health Series” and you should find all the current posts.

No, it isn’t a joke or a euphemism. What I mean by “dirty water” is water that, technically, isn’t clean.

Allow me to explain. The water we currently drink is filtered for impurities, salt and parasites. In short, we strip out of it anything that would make us ill. But we’re also stripping out of it many beneficial elements. Some of the “dirt” found in the natural water our animal friends and tribal relatives drink is actually great for our health and by only drinking cleaned, processed tapwater or carefully decontaminated mineral water we’re missing out on it.

We still want to drink dirty water. This is why we enjoy slightly flavoured drinks over water and why we feel more hydrated by sports drinks and coconut water than simple H2O. But whilst we don’t want to miss out on the good dirt, we also really, really, really want to miss out on the stuff that would make us ill.

So why not make our own dirty water? With a few simple steps we can create our own lightly contaminated, flavoured water that contains various extra nutrients, salts and balance-restoring elements, just like water from a wild spring. But without worms.

For these mixes, take note of two things:

Firstly all measurements assume you’re making a pint of dirty water.

And secondly, you don’t need all the elements every time. You can do just fine only using minerals, fats and salts, for example.

1: Minerals.

The first step to healthy dirty water, is to replace trace minerals. This can be done by using mineral water or coconut water as your base. You can also dissolve eggshells in water or use milk. A mineral mix in water works well too.

2: Salts.

Your body actually needs a tiny amount of salt for proper hydration. Ever feel really thirsty, but water passes through you and you still feel thirsty? That’s a salt deficiency. You will need literally a gram or two of salt, less than 1/8 of a teaspoon. Sea salt is best, but iodized salt is beneficial for people who rarely consume salt with their food. If you’re using coconut water or aloe vera, you will not need much if any extra salt in your drink.

3: Sugars.

Again, can help with proper hydration. As a sports recovery drink, consider two teaspoons of sugars, but in general half or one should suffice. Good sugars include palm sugar, brown cane sugar, maple syrup or honey.

4: Fats.

Some fats are almost absent in our diets and we can add these back in with our healthy dirty water. 1-5ml of any of these is good, but always consider your diet as a whole and try and supplement the fat you’re lacking. Omega oil compound, omega 3, olive oil, coconut oil, cocoa butter or shea butter can all add great nutrients. I sometimes use a whole egg yolk as well.

5: Acids.

Some acidic-tasting foods can carry a lot of nutritional density and healthy enzymes. In small doses, they will taste lovely in your dirty water. A teaspoon of lemon juice, pineapple juice, pineapple pulp, kiwi pulp or orange juice could do you some good.

6: Alkalines.

If you find your stomach is burning like a furnace but it’s not time to eat yet, consider adding something for the acid to work on a bit. Again, eggshell water or milk (if you’re lactose tolerant) can help here. Aloe vera is also very good, as are most blended green vegetables. Just use a couple of tablespoons.

7: Leaves and infusions.

Tea leaves and most flowers and herbs can add nutrition and antioxidants as well as flavour. You don’t need vast amounts, just enough that your water is lightly coloured and/or flavoured. For best results, soak around a tablespoon in the base water overnight.

8: Spices and blends.

But it’s not just greenery that has antioxidants. Plenty of spices and even blends like coffee or cocoa also have them. However we don’t really need that much. A total half a teaspoon of spices at the most should be fine.

9: Fruits.

You can’t actually get much out of fruits from infusing them in water, but fresh fruit and fruit juice can make it taste awesome.

10: A few examples.

-1 pint of mineral water, a few grams of himalayan sea salt, a teaspoon of lemon, a few grams of cloves and a dash of orange juice

-1 pint of water, eggshell water, a few grams of himalayan sea salt, a teaspoon of coconut puree and a teaspoon of honey

-1 pint of coconut water, a teaspoon of honey, a dash of orange juice

-1 pint of weak tea, eggshell water, a dash of lemon juice, a teaspoon of honey

-1 pint of water, aloe vera pulp, a few grams of himalayan sea salt, a teaspoon of lemon and a couple of tablespoons of berries

And that’s how I make my drinking water dirty, creating a nutritious, mineral and micronutrient rich drink.

TTFN and Happy Hunting!