Quick Fish Noodle Dinner.

Jon’s review is “nice sauce (approvingly] lots of noodles (not so approvingly]”. Perhaps a few less noodles and some veggies might be an idea next time!

Still, it took a grand total of around ten minutes, was amazingly rich and if you fancy a hot noodle dish with fish, a thick sauce and plenty of comfort, this is awesome.

Ingredients:

  • 200g fish pie mix
  • 300g salmon
  • 100g squid
  • 200ml double cream
  • 400ml milk
  • 150-250g dry rice noodles
  • powdered vegetable, chicken or fish stock
  • 1tbsp mustard
  • 2tsp worcestershire sauce

Utensils:

  • chopping board and knife
  • pot with lid

Recipe:

  1. Chop the fish into roughly 1.5″ bits. Put in the pot.
  2. Cover with cream and milk. Add stock, mustard and worcestershire sauce.
  3. Simmer until the fish is cooked.
  4. Add the noodles and stir through. Take off the heat once stirred.
  5. Making sure the noodles are submerged, cover the pot and leave a few minutes.
  6. Serve hot.

Fast, satisfying dinner. 😀

What quick meals do you like at your home? And what would you call an appropriate noodle-fish ratio?

 

For help starting out homemaking, check out The ESSENTIAL Beginner Homemaker’s Guide. For help budgeting all your everday and not-so-everyday essentials, from food to transport to clothes, check out On A Budget: The good homemaker’s guide to economizing.

How To… assemble the compenents of a good stew.

Repost from a while back. ^^

Stew is awesome for you.

Think about it: it’s a combination of anything you want or need (fruits, tubers, meats, legumes, grains, fish, nuts, seeds, leaves, roots…), all cooked until perfectly digestible. If you want to preserve certain heat-unstable vitamins, then you can just add an ingredient at the end, when your bowl is cooled and ready to eat. The only utensils you need are a chopping board, a few knives, a pot, a stirring spoon and a ladle for serving; all of which clean easily because of the amount of moisture in a stew. You keep all of the nutrients that are lost in boiling and throwing the water away. You keep all of the fat that is lost in roasting or frying something. Chances of getting charcoal in it are very low, which reduces potential carcinogens. It is full of fluid for hydration. It can be recycled into soups, pies and curries. A stew is absolute nutritional and gustatory perfection, specifically because it’s so adaptable. You can make a Paleo stew or a legume-based stew or a fish stew or a vegetarian stew or a four-meat stew or a vegan stew or a boiled stew or a soaked stew… You can make it however you want or need and season it perfectly to taste. It is warming like a soup and hearty like a roast dinner.

It’s also amazingly good for you. But Jamie Lewis has already gone into this in far greater depth than anyone else; so, provided you’re not easily offended and/or can block images on your computer, read on: Part 1, Part 2, Part 3.

Being the way I am, I’d also like to go into how economical stews, curries and the likes can be, as well as how easy they are to make. So, without further ado, here are some stews (new and from my old blog) that are cheap to make and good for you. Every one of these was basically made by hacking the ingredients up and putting them in a pot on a low-to-medium heat for a few hours. They are also hatchet stews: stews made with whatever we had lying around or needed to use up. So, whilst they’re all amazing and worth making, think of this more as an example of how cheaply and easily you can make an amazing stew with anything you have in the house.

Stew 1: Lamb and chicken stew.

  • Ingredients: 800g lamb chump chops, 6 chicken drumsticks, 5 chicken thighs, 800g chopped tomato, 700g potato, 2 large carrots, Italian herb mix, salt, pepper.
  • Servings: 9.
  • Cost per serving: 91p.
  • Nutrition per serving: 743kcal, 47g fat, 59g protein, 21g carbs.

Stew 2: Chicken liver curry.

  • Ingredients: 800g chicken livers, 300g rice, 400g peas, 200g mixed veg, 400g chopped tomato, (300g butter), tahina, paprika, anis, nutmeg, cinnamon, garlic, ginger, salt.
  • Servings: 6.
  • Cost per serving: 42p without butter, 62p with butter.
  • Nutrition per serving: Without butter: 375kcal, 7g fat, 28g protein, 50g carbs. With butter: 744kcal, 48g fat, 28g protein, 50g carbs.

Stew 3: Ox heart stew.

  • Ingredients: 300g ox heart, 10 mushrooms, 3 carrots, 1 onion, 300g chopped tomatoes, 75g butter, thyme, rosemary, basil, garlic.
  • Servings: 1.
  • Cost per serving: £2.14.
  • Nutrition per serving: 1093kcal, 73g fat, 64g protein, 45g carbs.

Stew 4: Sweet chicken stew.

  • Ingredients: 2 chicken quarters, 4 stalks of celery, 24 dates, 100g raisins, 100g butter, 600g potato, peppercorns, salt, cloves, thyme.
  • Servings: 2 without rice or butter, 4 with 100g rice and 50g butter.
  • Cost per serving:£1.07 without rice and added butter, 78p with.
  • Nutrition per serving: Without rice and butter: 1601kcal, 69g fat, 66g protein, 179g carbs. With rice and extra butter: 1484kcal, 76g fat, 35g protein, 165g carbs.

Bake in the oven near the end to brown the tops of the chicken quarters..

So not only are stews good for you and easy to make, but they’re probably one of the most economical dinners out there, regardless of whether you’re looking for pure value, value-fullness or value-calories.

 

For help starting out homemaking, check out The ESSENTIAL Beginner Homemaker’s Guide. For help budgeting all your everday and not-so-everyday essentials, from food to transport to clothes, check out On A Budget: The good homemaker’s guide to economizing.

Fit Friday, Fat Friday I. “Perfect baby diet.”

Year’s restart!

For now, I have three goals to report my fitness successes and fatness failures on.

  1. Adhering to my diet.
  2. Increasing weightlifting whilst I’m baby-free.
  3. Trying To Conceive.

DIET.

So far the diet looks like this:

  • Very high plant content.
  • Fruit restricted.
  • No alcohol.
  • Controlled caffeine (enough to keep my estrogen up and my moods even).
  • Low sugar, low salt, low irritants (peanuts, wheat, oats and dairy being main ones).
  • More nuts and seeds.
  • More berries rich in resveratrols.
  • More fish and seafood.
  • Red meat weekly.

Not a massive alteration to my current diet, really. More nuts, seeds, berries, fish and a stronger restriction on already restricted items. The calories go up and down, but it will be easy to get the right number of calories in, don’t worry!

Kind of brilliantly, this diet has meant I have lost 3 of the extra 4″ I had on my waist as of November, leaving me at 27″ (minus menstrual bloating I am probably back at 26″). But my hip fat hasn’t shrunk at all on this diet, leaving me 41″ hips. So yes, that’s a 0.63-0.66 WHR. And my bust has grown a little. Pretty pleased with myself. Hopefully plenty of rich nutrients in the hip fat for feeding many babies with.

WEIGHTS.

My current weights are:

LIFT

WEIGHT

SETS

REPS

Deadlift

52.5kg

4

2

Squats

57.5kg

8

2

Squats II

45kg

2

12

Shrugs

60kg

5

2

Rows

36kg

8

2

Rows II

28.5kg

2

12

Overhead press

22kg

8

2

Overhead press II

15kg

2

12

Incline bench

38.5kg

8

2

Flat bench

30kg

2

12

Hammer curls

7.5kg each hand

2

12

Rear lateral raises

3.5kg each hand

2

12

Wanting the first three as close as possible to my new lean weight of 68kg ASAP. Will obviously have to stop once I know I’m pregnant, but want to get there if possible.

TTC.

So far I have got some B vitamin supplements in and my usual fish oils, plus the cleaned up diet. Need to get folate, either from natural or additional supplementation. Yet to start trying, but as soon as the red dragon’s gone it will be time!

How are everyone’s January fitness, diet, health and activity goals going?